Now that you have everything you need to fish with a
tube.....how does it all go together? Of course, this is an area
where ones own personal preferences come into play. Here are
three techniques we use for fishing with a tube......

Technique Two:
This is the most common way to use a tube fly.
STEP ONE:
Slide your tube fly on. This picture is of a
bare tube, yours will be a bit more tricky
because of the feathers and fur.
STEP TWO:
Slide your junction tube on the line.
STEP THREE:
Tie on your hook.
STEP FOUR:
Twist the junction tube onto the
end of the tube
.
STEP FIVE:
Pull your line so that the eye of the
hook is securely in the junction tube
For longer, "webbier" patterns, we'll
often use an extra long section of
junction tube.....another possibility

Technique Three:
This is also a great way to fish a tube. The loop allows you to change
damaged hooks quickly
STEP ONE:
Thread the line through your tube and then a bead.
Create a knotted loop at least 1.5 inches long. Trim
the knot and wedge the bead over the knot. Make
sure that the bead can not slip over the knot.
The Canadian Tubefly Company
How to Fish a Tube
STEP TWO:
Thread the
loop through
the eye of
your hook.
STEP Three:
Pull your loop
over the point
of the hook
STEP FOUR:
Pull your
line tight.
STEP FIVE:
Give your line
another pull to
tighten everything
up
As most fly tiers know, tube flies have exploded in popularity in the past decade, and with
that explosion new approaches and techniques to fish them have grown exponentially. Junction
tubes (also known as hook sleeves) are an important part of the whole tube fly package.
Without a reasonably secure connection between your tube and hook, your overall fly will not
cast, flow, or fish the way you intended it.

While testing new patterns the last few seasons, I have moved away from the usual way on
connecting the tube and the hook. It began when I start using
Flex Tube as a junction tube
instead of just using it for actual tube patterns. Now available in over 20 colours, both opaque
and transparent,
Flex Tube adds an extra dimension to your fly. Not only does it work as a
fabulous junction tube (because of its flexibility and temperature resistant properties) it also
gives that extra splash of either vibrant or subtle colour to your pattern.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FULL STORY....................

Technique One:
Inserting a liner tube to the back of the tube
Squeeze on your Flex Tube an add your hook.
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